The Fall Course *McLuhan Site* your TV is tuned to:http://www.digitallantern.net/beaulieuhome.htm/McLuhan/course/index.html
April 25, 1996

Understanding Media: The Individual and Society

a media studies course

Fall 1996
3 days
Oct 12 Saturday 10am-3pm
Oct 19 Saturday 10am-3pm
Oct 26 Saturday 10am-3pm

LOCATION: SFSU Downtown Center, 425 Market

instructor: Mark Beaulieu

  1. The official spring 96 course description.
  2. The unoffical fall 96 course description.

Understanding Media: The Individual and Society


Re-opening Marshall McLuhan's "Understanding Media" (MIT Press 1995) as
a base to reconsider our media assumptions, the instructor shares years
of research into the enigmatic life and newly re-explored ideas of
Marshall McLuhan. After examining the principles of media, the class
will examine multi-modal experiences and consider current models of the
mind, emotion and the senses with special emphasis on synesthesia
theory. From this basis we will look at roots of today's modern media of
computers and digital networks and review Nicholas Negroponte's "Being
Digital" and the writings of George Gilder. To complete a foundation for
future thinking, we will review modern media and their effects and see
how modern architectural theories regard design for personal and social
use. The instructor's course site at
http://www.digitallantern.net/beaulieuhome.htm/McLuhan/course explains that this
study observes and studies all media, then examines closely digital
interactive and networked media finally considering emerging individual
and social models.


Course-related outbound links

  1. The Spring 96 course description.
  2. The Spring 96 teaching outline.
  3. The Fall 96 course description.
  4. The McLuhan web site.

Course-related books

  1. Marshall McLuhan's Understanding Media (MIT Press 1995)
    Nicholas Negroponte's Being Digital
    George Gilder's Life After Television
    William Mitchell's City of Bits
    Christopher Alexander's Timeless Way of Building and Pattern Language
    Stuart Brand's How Buildings Learn
    Dr. Richard Cytowic's The Man Who Tasted Shapes and The Neurological Side of Neuropsychology

mail comments to: markbeau@mac.com

last edited 04/16/01